Prevent Yourself From Getting Fired With These 5 Tips (Horrible Boss Edition)

You have a disorganized, rude, and inappropriate supervisor who always wants to throw you under the bus. You’re sick of it and are afraid they may jeopardize your job. Here’s what you do:

Before I begin, I wanted to shout out all my friends in the US, Russia, Sweden, Denmark, Turkey, Canada, UK, Romania, Germany, and Ireland!! Thank you so much for visiting my page and taking time out of your day to read my tips, rants, and raves! I appreciate you and would love to hear your comments (I have Google translate). Big hugs to you!

  1. Read your handbook and job descriptionUpon hire, you must, I say, you must read your employee handbook and make sure you know all of your responsibilities and rights. If you ever find yourself arguing with your supervisor, look to your handbook and see what the next steps are. If there are none, email HR and write a clear statement of facts. The handbook will help you perform your best and prevent you from overlooking important strategies in problem solving situations.
  2. Try to move forward – Sometimes people have bad days, and that’s okay. But make sure they are aware that you are not afraid to speak up for yourself and that you want to work things out. Always show cooperation. If you do this, it will deter them from trying to start arguments with you.
  3. Be polite – Even when you don’t mean it. Do your best to be polite and stick to the facts. No matter the issue, show your professional conduct at all times despite others’ lack thereof. Why? Because they will have nothing to use against you. People make mistakes, but people are terminated for things other than work performance. Lying, gossiping, and creating a hostile work environment to name a few.
  4. Write everything down As soon as something happens, write it down. I know that sounds time-consuming, but the truth is (I deal with cases like these at work) when your supervisors ask you the details of events, it’s super important that you write and recollect things in detail the moment it happens, or at least within the first few hours. This information will impact your inquiries/concerns or complaints.
  5. Email HR: HR is there to protect you and the company; don’t forget that. Speak with your HR manager or hire up about having a team meeting. Remember, you do not attack the other party; that weakens your complaint. Explain the facts contemporaneously so they can analyze. If you attack your manager, it will look like a personal vendetta, and that’s where HR may see this as an attack and could very well not want this to happen with other co-workers. Don’t do this. Show them clear examples of the issues that violate the company handbook, but do not, I repeat, do not attack. Simply point out the problems, and be willing to work with moving forward. Be sure to state in your inquiry that you want to make sure that you can both work professionally and kind with one another, and you are taking all necessary actions help assist with this.

Have a great week ahead.

Author: Gene

Passionate about trying new things and then writing about them. My background is in Film, Media, and Talent Acquisition, so there's much to explore. Still trying to figure out the perfect iced coffee and oat milk ratio; any tips?

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