Notes on an Execution By Danya Kukafka

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Since 👻 Halloween 🎃 is right around the corner, I figured sharing this book would be *chef’s kiss* for the Halloween theme. Usually, I’m not one to read thriller novels, but this one was fantastic! 

Genre: Thriller 🙂 

Breakdown: Readers will find themselves at the story’s apex and work their way backward. The novel lays out out life of Ansel Packar, a serial killer on death row, told by him and the women who have surrounded his past and present. The storyline begins with the countdown starting at the twelfth hour, where Ansel walks us through the narrative of his thoughts and what it’s like to be on death row. Other characters include his family, work colleagues, and a detective with a connected past to Ansel, which we find out later in the story. 

Read it if: You’d like to keep your lights on at night.

Is it funny: Nope.

The cover: Purple, with an easter egg, quite beautiful.

Do I recommend it: Absolutely, the author made this book such an easy read, so many people I recommend it to tell me that they could not put it down! 

Every turn of the page makes you wonder where this story is leading up to next; it was so good.

What I loved most about this book is that Danya did not throw around fancy words that remove you from the momentum of the story; it was very conversational and intentional, which really held me in. Absolutely a great read; great job Danya!

Rating: 4 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Book Review: Tender is the Flesh by Augustina Bazterrica

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After a grave virus eats away most animal life, Augustina’s characters resort to cannibalism in this dystopian universe.

Genre: Dystopian Fiction

I stumbled across this book and now cannot see the world the same again. This world is entirely life-altering, simply because there are severe parallels between our current factory farming and the world that Bazterrica creates in her novel. Human flesh* (a specific kind of human-bred meat) is nothing more than a way to feed and indulge those who can afford it. 

Breakdown: Augustina does a tremendous job describing the characters and their headspace to her readers in this dystopian world. Once horrified by their choice to eat humans, the main character is now faced with living in their reality, working at a farming factory where they breed, kill, and sell human meat. The narrator describes the laws established to produce this meat, they call “heads” and walks us through the process of treating them like farm animals. These “heads” are tortured, killed, abused, and without dignity (much like factory farming). 

Read it if: You want to be seriously horrified. 

Is it funny: No… oh no..

The cover: An amalgamation of a half-human and half cow (animal), terrifying.

Do I recommend it: I really do. If you’re not into horror or dystopian readings, this is a great one, to begin with. I am still recovering from it…

Rating: 5 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

The Sum of Small Things: A Theory of the Aspirational Class by Elizabeth Currid-Halkett

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Grab this non-fiction book on Scribd

From breastfeeding etiquette to shopping at Whole Foods, Elizabeth Currid-Halkett writes about the inconspicuous and conspicuous differences in classes one can recognize by observing simple everyday activities.

Genre: Self-help

A colleague of mine amassed a substantial amount of wealth, making it effortless to retire before forty. It got me thinking of what their new life will look like. I’ve always heard how the wealthy take their vacations, shop, and eat, but this time, I wanted to find a book that could tell me more about the differences and similarities between classes in general. This book was a really great start in funding my curiosity. If you rather listen to it, you should try scribd.com

Read it if: You’re up for an entertaining and easy read, filled with neat factoids about classes, happening in real-time.

What’s it about: You’ll learn about the class systems of today and why we do the things we do when it comes to money, class, and status. Elizabeth discusses the aspirational class’s upward mobility to achieve and succeed in everyday social and work life. She does a great job at bringing back historical theorists that discuss the ideas of class and the need to impress or suppress the concept of wealth depending on several geographical, racial, and cultural perspectives.

Is it funny: No, but I find that a non-issue!

The cover: Satisfying to look at, true to the book.

Do I recommend it: I do. I did not expect this book to indulge me the way it did. It was cleverly written and allowed me to see certain examples she used in the book in real-time (cough cough, Whole Foods). Thanks, Elizabeth!

Rating: 5 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️