Review: American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis

A horrific fictional encounter with a serial killer. Patrick Bateman, a wealthy Wall Street bachelor, roaming the streets of New York City. Reader beware.

Genre: Transgressive Fiction/Horror

Read it if: You want to have terrible nightmares and irreparable emotional trauma about men, women, puppies, and New York City as a whole. The images haunted me for days. Easton really dives into what this particular serial killer wants, some of which were actually highlighted on Psychology Today: “Understanding What Drives Serial Killers” – a great read, if you’re interested.

Breakdown: New York during the ’80s and revolves around Patrick Bateman. He’s a wealthy investment banker on Wall Street who frequently does drugs, booze, and women when he’s not killing them. The scary thing is that within his friend’s circle, he’s a saint. He seems to suffer from a personality disorder and is a horrible addition to Ellis’s fictitious society.

Is it funny: Nope! The details feel so real, especially when Bateman kills people, pets, etc. It’s too much gore for my taste.

The cover: He’s totally my type. Seductive, charming, emotionless -kidding. I also watched the movie “American Psycho” starring Christian Bale. Both the film and the book were disturbing. The cover says it all. It’s all about one guy who’s an American, Psycho.

Do I recommend it: I started reading this book in Germany and jet-lagged like no other. Honestly, the only book I had that wasn’t self-help, and I was trying to get out of my norm—big mistake. I would begrudgingly recommend it because of how clear Ellis narrates the story, but I wouldn’t be sad if you didn’t read it. His writing is seamless, and every character is carefully described, even (sadly) the murderous, homophobic, and racist interactions that take place. This was painful to swallow. But I think it’s essential to read controversy, to better understand what it’s capable of. I appreciate writers that take their time to cleverly explain small details that add to a reader’s imagination, be it good or bad, and Ellis does this.

Rating: 3 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️

Homemade Salsa Recipe

Chef’s kiss 🙂

An easy and tasty homemade salsa recipe that is both fresh and healthy. Great for parties of two or four.

Ingredients: 

  • 3 plum tomatoes 🍅, diced
  • 1 lime, squeezed (I like my salsa super tangy, so start with 1/2 lime, and see how you like it).
  • 1/4 cup of cilantro 🌿
  • 1/4 cup of white onion 🧅, diced.
  • 1 teaspoon of salt 🧂(more, if you’re okay with it)
  • 1/2 teaspoon of pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon of chili powder

Equipment:

  • 1 sharp knife
  • 1 spoon
  • Measuring cups/spoons
  • A big bowl
  • A small bowl (for your powders)
  • A volunteer to taste your concoction.

Instructions: Start dicing the tomatoes until they’re small, like chiclets or teeth. Then dice the onion into smaller versions of that. Grab the cilantro and finely chop it up so they look like tiny flakes. Mix them around. Let these ingredients sit with each other while you grab the salt, pepper, chili powder and mix them in a separate bowl.

After that, squeeze the lime juice into the bowl with tomatoes, onion, and cilantro. Once mixed, add the powdered ingredients and mix some more. Voila! 

I made this salsa during a family gathering, and there was a lot of seafood surrounding me. Even though I’m not a fan of seafood, this salsa goes really great with oysters and shrimp. It brings out the taste (I suppose) and really puckers your lips. 

If you’re like me and don’t eat seafood, snag some chips to eat it with, or add black beans to make it into a nice dip.

Enjoy!

Review: Caviar Dreams Tuna Fish Budget By Margaret Josephs

Bravo’s Real Housewives of New Jersey, Margaret Josephs, opens up in her tell-all book about business and life.

Find the hard cover or check out the audio version.

Besides being a TV Reality Star, Margaret Josephs is the founder of the Macbeth Collection, Candie Couture, and more.

Genre: Biography

Read it if: You have simple curiosity lurking.

Breakdown: “The Marge,” as she calls herself, describes the less than idealistic mother-daughter relationship she survived and confesses how this role reversal affected her romantic relationships. Margaret also reveals the family-in-business dynamic she’s created.

Check out Margaret’s biography via Bravo here.

Is it funny: It’s not, sadly no. Some of the one-liners were not even close to comical but rather a bit uncomfortable to listen to; I don’t think Margaret needed to say some of them; they sounded forced and used more for added shock-value.

The cover: Fascinating color scheme. Great choices, Margaret!

Do I recommend it: No. This book is an easy read for the beach; if you’re curious about the housewives of New Jersey and want to know a little more about what’s said on the show that the cameras don’t show. I don’t deduce this will alter your perspective of life. While Margaret does give life advice, I didn’t gain valuable insight, personally. The meat of the story (in my opinion) was the infidelity she committed (twice; one which led to her second marriage) and the sexual harassment she faced from previous business partners. Other than that, there was little depth. I was able to relate to the strained relationship she had earlier on in life with her mother, and that was a very vulnerable moment that I did appreciate.

I will note that I enjoyed Margaret’s positive energy she described throughout the hardships she endured. She sounds like a girls girl who would be great to go on vacation with or brunch. Hope this helped you choose your next read. 

Rating: 1 Star⭐️

%d bloggers like this: