Review: Caviar Dreams Tuna Fish Budget By Margaret Josephs

Bravo’s Real Housewives of New Jersey, Margaret Josephs, opens up in her tell-all book about business and life.

Find the hard cover or check out the audio version.

Besides being a TV Reality Star, Margaret Josephs is the founder of the Macbeth Collection, Candie Couture, and more.

Read it if: You have simple curiosity lurking.

What’s it about: “The Marge,” as she calls herself, describes the less than idealistic mother-daughter relationship she survived and explained how this role reversal affected her romantic relationships. Margaret also reveals the family-in-business dynamic she’s created.

Check out Margaret’s biography via Bravo here.

Is it funny: It’s not. Some of the one-liners were not even close to comical but rather a bit uncomfortable to listen to; I don’t think Margaret needed to say some of them; they sounded forced and used more for added shock-value. 

The cover: Fascinating to look at. I like the color scheme. Great choices, Margaret!

Do I recommend it: No. This book is an easy read for the beach; if you’re curious about the housewives of New Jersey and want to know a little more about what’s said on the show that the cameras don’t show. I don’t deduce that this will alter your way of life. While Margaret does give life advice, I didn’t gain valuable insight, personally. The meat of the story (in my opinion) was the infidelity she committed (twice; one which led to her second marriage) and the sexual harassment she faced from previous business partners. Other than that, there was little depth. I was able to relate to the strained relationship she had earlier on in life with her mother, and that was a very vulnerable moment that I did appreciate.

I will note that I enjoyed Margaret’s positive energy she described throughout the hardships she endured. She sounds like a girls girl who would be great to go on vacation with or brunch. Hope this helped you choose your next read. 

Rating: D+

Review: Act Like a Success Think Like a Success by Steve Harvey

Reviewing Comedian and Talk Show Host Steve Harvey’s book. No spoilers just review bites.

A great self-help book written by Comedian and TV host/Film Star Steve Harvey. Emphasis on self-help. Created with generous sprinkles of humor, a few personal stories, and touching relatability.

Check out the audiobook version from Scribed

Read it if: You have a great idea with a foggy plan and are on the ledge. If you’re asking yourself what to do with your life and have a hunch. This book will help you leap into your dream –with a plan.

What’s it about: Steve provides research, personal stories, and templates so you can move forward with your vision. This isn’t some overpaid celebrity talking fluff. At least not in this book. He provides strategies such as the SMART: S.(specific), M.(measurable), A.(achievable) R.(relevant), T.(time-sensitive) system for your goals, along with a vision board and questions that really do help.

Is it funny: Yes, but it’s not really a book for sh**s and giggles. He provides stories of personal struggles that are always great and relatable. Beyond the worksheets, he includes information on family, health, money, mental states, and such.

The cover: The colors resemble power, stability, and a bit of a college text-booky vibe. Don’t worry; it’s not heavy whatsoever.  Regardless, Steve looks successful and approachable. You also can’t miss his projector-sized teeth, which, I have to admit, makes me a bit jealous.

Do I recommend it: The one thing we didn’t agree upon, and it’s a personal choice, is God. I’m Agnostic, so I can’t really relate to this, but I respect him for it and appreciate his spiritual honesty. Other than that, this book is solid. Great job, Steve. I loved it!

Rating: A

Review: The Subtle Art of Not Giving A F**k by Mark Manson

It’s an easy self-help book to read, that encourages you not to care about the little things, only the things that matter. A bit idealistic, and somewhat self-indulgent. Either way, I still enjoyed a few bits.

Check out the paperback version or the audio version.

Some of it made me want to give a F***k…

Read it if: You think you have too much on your plate, not enough “time,” and sh**priorities. Read it, if you want to better understand why you do what you do (and how to stop if it’s what you’re craving). Also, read it if you want to hear some wisecracks you’d probably think to yourself but never say out loud.

It’s about: Learning not to care but actually care a lot about what you want to gain out of life. Mark has a bit of a philosophical approach to your troubles, in where he tells you flat out that you’re going to die, and maybe, you should start giving a f*ck about the things that truly matter and less so, of the trivial things.

Is it funny: Sometimes. Not the best comic relief, if that’s what you’re looking for, but entertaining.

The cover:  As you can see, ORANGE. It reminded me of this one time, where I went to an interview, and the walls were as bright as this color. When I asked the Recruiter why they chose orange, she told me it was because it calms the interviewees down. I’m guessing Mark Manson’s intention was to calm down his readers as well. Note taken.

Do I recommend it: I think this book is a regurgitation and amalgamation of the 48 Laws of Power by Robert Greene and 12 Rules for Life by Jordan Peterson. Though these two books are my favorites, I feel that the S.A.N.G.A.F, is more of a light skimming of the two, so I didn’t really feel as though I gained thorough knowledge from it. It’s great for an easy read and not an in-depth approach to your troubles. Don’t expect it to scalpel through your deep desires and pour over your greatest struggles. I’d say that this book will suit those who have a perceived normal/tiny bit volatile lifestyle. 

Rating: C+