Review: The Subtle Art of Not Giving A F**k by Mark Manson

It’s an easy self-help book to read, that encourages you not to care about the little things, only the things that matter. A bit idealistic, and somewhat self-indulgent. Either way, I still enjoyed a few bits.

Check out the paperback version or the audio version.

Some of it made me want to give a F***k…

Read it if: You think you have too much on your plate, not enough “time,” and sh**priorities. Read it, if you want to better understand why you do what you do (and how to stop if it’s what you’re craving). Also, read it if you want to hear some wisecracks you’d probably think to yourself but never say out loud.

It’s about: Learning not to care but actually care a lot about what you want to gain out of life. Mark has a bit of a philosophical approach to your troubles, in where he tells you flat out that you’re going to die, and maybe, you should start giving a f*ck about the things that truly matter and less so, of the trivial things.

Is it funny: Sometimes. Not the best comic relief, if that’s what you’re looking for, but entertaining.

The cover:  As you can see, ORANGE. It reminded me of this one time, where I went to an interview, and the walls were as bright as this color. When I asked the Recruiter why they chose orange, she told me it was because it calms the interviewees down. I’m guessing Mark Manson’s intention was to calm down his readers as well. Note taken.

Do I recommend it: I think this book is a regurgitation and amalgamation of the 48 Laws of Power by Robert Greene and 12 Rules for Life by Jordan Peterson. Though these two books are my favorites, I feel that the S.A.N.G.A.F, is more of a light skimming of the two, so I didn’t really feel as though I gained thorough knowledge from it. It’s great for an easy read and not an in-depth approach to your troubles. Don’t expect it to scalpel through your deep desires and pour over your greatest struggles. I’d say that this book will suit those who have a perceived normal/tiny bit volatile lifestyle. 

Rating: C+

Review: American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis

A horrific fictional encounter with a serial killer. Patrick Bateman, a wealthy Wall Street bachelor, roaming the streets of New York City. Reader beware.

Price: Varies, digital or paperback from 12.99 to 14.95 USD.

Read it if: You want to have terrible nightmares and irreparable emotional trauma about men, women, puppies, and New York City as a whole. The images haunted me for days. Easton really dives into what this particular serial killer wants, some of which were actually highlighted on Psychology Today: “Understanding What Drives Serial Killers” – a great read, if you’re interested.

It’s about: New York during the ’80s and revolves around Patrick Bateman. He’s a wealthy investment banker on Wall Street who frequently does drugs, booze, and women when he’s not killing them. The scary thing is that within his friend’s circle, he’s a saint. He seems to suffer from a personality disorder and is a horrible addition to Ellis’s fictitious society.

Is it funny: Nope! The details feel so real, especially when Bateman kills people, pets, etc. It’s too much gore for my taste.

The cover: He’s totally my type. Seductive, charming, emotionless -kidding. I also watched the movie “American Psycho” starring Christian Bale. Both the film and the book were disturbing. The cover says it all. It’s all about one guy who’s an American, Psycho.

Do I recommend it: I started reading this book in Germany and jet-lagged like no other. Honestly, the only book I had that wasn’t self-help, and I was trying to get out of my norm—big mistake. I would begrudgingly recommend it because of how clear Ellis narrates the story, but I wouldn’t be sad if you didn’t read it. His writing is seamless, and every character is carefully described, even (sadly) the murderous, homophobic, and racist interactions that take place. This was painful to swallow. But I think it’s essential to read controversy, to better understand what it’s capable of. I appreciate writers that take their time to cleverly explain small details that add to a reader’s imagination, be it good or bad, and Ellis does this.

Rating: D